Volume (5)


Volume (5), Issue (1), April – 2016

Abstract:
The purpose of the current study was to explore the effectiveness of story mapping on reading comprehension skills of children with ADHD. 10 students in grades five who had been identified as having ADHD were chosen .The sample was randomly divided into two groups; experimental (n= 5 boys) and control (n= 5 boys). Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Test (ADHDT), and Reading Comprehension Test were used. Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were employed for data analysis. Results from this study indicated the effectiveness of story mapping on reading comprehension skills of the students in the experimental group.

Keywords:

Story mapping , reading comprehension skills ,children with ADHD.


Volume (5), Issue (2), September – 2016

Abstract:
Democracy is one of heterogeneous and, at the same time, ambiguous beings which make up a set of phenomena that can be observed in many modern societies. Since the dawn of time pedagogy has been dealing with public matters and interests connected with people or institutions which wielded power or authority over students or those who are involved in socialization and education processes. Thus, particularly now – after so many years of social and political transformation of the Third Republic of Poland, it must define its contribution to those transformations and express its opinion on democracy and its relationships with teaching sciences and art of education. Studies on relationships among pedagogy, social and political processes should have a crucial meaning not only for scientists but also for those exercising power so that they can answer the question: Where is Polish education going to? Is there in Polish education any place for democracy as a value, so for: participation, justice, equality, making joint decisions, working in teams, cooperation, division of authority, enhancement of social roles, mutual respect, diversity and variety?

Keywords:

theory of education, system of education, educational politics, educational macro policy, democracy.


Volume (5), Issue (3), December – 2016

Abstract:
Although often denied by theoreticians and translators, to this day these two groups see translation as heir to a linguistic perspective that has dominated the field since the 1960s. Many translators tend to compose their texts as if coming from the task of translating the meaning of one word after the other, reticent of writing a text in the target language that fails to respect the source text, or diverges from the author or her/his intentions. Thus, the word in the source language must have primacy over that of the target language, which is a constant hostage to the language of the so-called original or source text. This subservience is generally understood as a quality of a translator who is concerned in remaining faithful to the author, whose relation to the translator is that of an authority. Translation in this paper will be discussed from the standpoint of this strongly-held assumption among translators, who strive to achieve the ideal of (im)possible faithfulness to the source text (or author). On one hand, this is understood as violence against the source text (Foucault, 1975 [1977, p. 23) and on the other, as a result of difference, postulated by Derrida (1967).

Keywords:

Translation, author, meaning, language, culture